Alessio De Vecchi

Alessio De Vecchi

His videos have a little twist or an edge and he certainly has a grasp on the human form. Let鈥檚 find out who Devecchi is and then ask how and why.

Where are you from originally? 
I am from Milan, Italy. I lived in New York for nine years and moved to Tokyo two years ago!

How long have you been in Tokyo and why did you move there? How has it impacted your work?
Why? For the food and the girls, of course! :D

Jokes aside, I have always loved hyper-urban environments and mega-infrastructures. I have been obsessed with Blade Runner and Japanese architecture (metabolism in particular) so Tokyo felt like a natural choice.

Living in big cities is inspiring to me. It鈥檚 fascinating how - despite the high density of people -human interaction is difficult and dry. I try to recount the sense of isolation, solitude and alienation through my work, somehow.

Where did you first learn how to do CG and was there an immediate connection? Did it come naturally to you?
I studied industrial design and I started my career as a product designer. I soon realized that it lacked in immediacy. I always wanted to work with 3d, but I needed a faster paced workflow. I had a friend in NYC working for a big advertising agency and I figured that doing 3d for advertising might have been the way to go. 

What programs do you use to achieve your results? 
All of them! ahah.. However, Cinema4d, Houdini and Octane Renderer are my main tools.

Do you feel like your brain is different from most people like on the train or in the general public?!
Ahah...I have OCD with a pinch of ADD, so I guess you can say that! However, I have a strong visual mind, so anything that I observe might trigger ideas that I later transpose into my personal 3d work.

How did you learn to use the human form so well? Lots and lots of figuring drawing classes?
I can't draw! ...Not well, at least. I am indeed fascinated by the human form. Sometimes my humans take the form of food, liquid, or natural fibres. They deform and fall. I guess I am talking about the frailty of being human. Humans are so versatile and yet so fragile. So impermanent. Definitely so. I guess that allows for exorcising the fear of death, somehow. An attempt to defeat mortality. And I think that鈥檚 one of the most important functions of the art overall. 

Do you have any hobbies? Like golf or cake decorating or hula hooping?
Cooking! It's somewhat of a design process, isn't it?

 

Images courtesy of ALESSIO DE VECCHI

 

interview ASHLEY MUNNS

 

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